Monday, February 28, 2011

Life this Week: February 28, 1938

Fair-use image from Wikipedia
  • I am a staunch feminist, a supporter of equal rights for women (and everybody) and a supporter of reproductive rights (I know, I just got political and I don't like to get political on my blog, but I find it amazing that in the twenty-first century that feminism can still be controversial in America.), so I'm loving this photograph of feminists (including Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony and Lillie Devereux Blake, whose name I adore) from 1888 and the photographs of suffragettes on the following page.
  • I can't get away from the political today--while I may not agree with William Allen White on "What's the Matter with Kansas?", I do find it amazing that the local newspaper editor of a small Kansas town could have become a national figure.  Paul and I stopped at Emporia on our way to Kansas City two years ago, and it's not as cute as it was in 1938, but what small town is?
  • In 1938, Helen Keller campaigned for the American Foundation for the Blind.  She wrote of Enrico Caruso, "With my fingers on his lips, [he] poured his golden voice into my hands."  On a less sentimental note, George Bernard Shaw compared Helen Keller's work to that of Voltaire's then stated that "all Americans are blind and deaf--and dumb."
  • This week's Movie of the Week is Bringing Up Baby.*  If you haven't seen it, do not pass go, do not collect $200, go directly to the video store/Netflix queue/Tivo and get this movie.  It is the screwball comedy to end all screwball comedies.  It's ridiculous and wonderful at the same time. 
  • Check out the amazing photographs of Harvard's glass flower collection.
  • This article about the successes of the WPA shows the benefits of spending taxpayer dollars on "hope and self-respect" and putting "workers unneeded for production to providing services, to making life brighter and happier and healthier for everybody."
  • The events that will lead to the Anschluß are set in motion as "Nazi Germany Woos and Wins Gay Little Austria."  
  • "The Duke of Norfolk Sells the Contents of His Townhouse" because the taxes are too high even for the "premiere peer of the realm."
  • Since glorifying the Confederacy was a common pastime in the 1930s, read "Life Goes to a Party at which Ante-Bellum Days are Recalled at Washington and Lee."  Check out those bloomers.


This issue is recipe-less, but I did make Chicken Noodle Soup based on a recipe in Modern Meal Maker.  It's a great way to use up the vegetables from making chicken stock and is really simple to make.

Just bring 2 cups chicken stock per person to a boil (be sure to salt it), then cook 1/2 cup dried egg noodles per person in the stock.  Add 1/2 cup shredded cooked chicken (per person) and cut-up cooked celery and carrots (the ones you used for the stock).  Done!  You can use this recipe for chicken stock and add a few extra carrots and celery stalks.

Since it looks like everyone got a kick out of the Sears and Roebuck catalog page last week, here's another, also from ancestry.com, also from the spring of 1938, which instructs on the subject of accessorizing:



*"I Can't Give You Anything But Love" (Annette Hanshaw, 1928)

Download at Internet Archive

6 comments:

  1. looove the accessories piece! Bringing Up Baby is so great. The COSTUMES Kate wears! Love it to bits.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I would be lovely and feminine in the park. I loved Bringing Up Baby. Not my favorite Katherine Hepburn or Cary Grant movie, but it is still good fun.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Posts like this are the reason I began reading blogs and eventually became a blogger myself. This was really interesting. Thanks for the time spent putting it all together for us. I hope you have a great day. Blessings...Mary

    ReplyDelete
  4. I love your Life This Week feature. I'm always amazed at how old it is, yet how current! I wish I had some of your chicken soup for lunch today!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I love the Life this Week feature--so fascinating. The stories you picked out are by turns disturbing (antebellum ball), chilling (Hitler), amazing (the glass flowers), and fun (Bringing Up Baby).

    ReplyDelete
  6. I love all the vintage references in your posts. My favourites from this post are the Sears catalogue pages and the song. I have never seen Bringing Up Baby, but I will have to do so. Nice looking soup too!

    ReplyDelete